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In pics: survivors of Nanjing Massacre

2019-12-13 Source:Xinhua Author:Ji Chunpeng

Combo photo taken on July 13, 2019 shows portrait of Cen Honglan, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre (R, top); Cen Honglan and his brother Cen Honggui, also a survivor of the massacre (L, top); Cen Honglan playing with Yu Huiyu, her sister Cen Hongying's great granddaughter (L, central); Cen Honglan showing her bullet wound by Japanese invaders (L, bottom); Cen Honglan (3rd, R) posing for a photo with her sister Cen Hongying (2nd, L) and her brother Cen Honggui (3rd, L); Cen Honglan sitting in a residential area in Nanjing, east China's Jiangsu Province. Cen Honglan was born on July 5, 1934. Her family moved to Nanjing in 1930 from a famine-stricken area in Jiangsu. In 1937, Cen Honglan's jaw got injured from Japanese invaders' gunshot, and her little brother Cen Xiaosan was burned alive in a house. Cen Honglan now lives in Suqian and has 5 children. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng, Li Xiang)

Combo photo taken on Nov. 15, 2019 shows Zhou Wenbin, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre, taking care of his fish at home (L, top); Zhou Wenbin sitting in his bedroom (L, central); Zhou Wenbin showing bullet wound on his left foot by Japanese invaders (L, bottom); Zhou Wenbin telling his past experience (up, central); a copy photo of Zhou Wenbin (2nd, R), his father Zhou Zhongyi (1st R, front) and his brother Zhou Wenxin (2nd R, second line) (C, bottom); Zhou Wenbin doing chores at home (R, top); Zhou Wenbin checking medicine instruction (R, central); Zhou Wenbin posing for a photo with his wife Fan Cuihua at home. Zhou Wenbin was born in January of 1938. During a mopping-up operation by the Japanese invaders, Zhou Wenbin, still an infant sleeping in a cradle, was seriously injured on his left foot by gunshot. His 11-year-old brother Zhou Wenxin, playing nearby, failed to escape and got a bullet clean through his leg. Zhou Wenbin got married in 1972 and has two daughters now. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng)

Combo photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows Fang Suxia, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre, exercising in her residential area (L, top); Fang Suxia reading newspapers at home (L, central); Fang Suxia chatting with her husband Zhou Wenshu (L, bottom); the portrait of Fang Suxia (C, top); copy of a family photo of Fang Suxia (R, back), her sisters Fang Suzhen (front) and Fang Suying (C, bottom); Fang Suxia sitting at home (R, top); Fang Suxia posing for a photo with her husband and daughter (R, central); Fang Suxia taking a walk with her daughter in her residential area. Fang Suxia was born on Nov. 11, 1934. After witnessing the massacre in Nanjing, Fang Suxia's family escaped by boat by a fluke in spite of the shooting rampage. However, Fang caught a fever and got hearing-impaired, and her grandmother died of a heart attack triggered by fear. Fang Suxia's uncle Fang Qingyi got separated and lost touch with the family. Later the family went back home and found it robbed of everything they had. Fang Suxia got married in 1953 and has a son and a daughter. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng)

Combo photo taken on July 12, 2019 shows Yu Changxiang, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre, cooking in kitchen (L, top); Yu Changxiang talking with a Japanese friend (L, central); Yu Changxiang walking at home (L, bottom); the portrait of Yu Changxiang (C, top); Yu Changxiang posing for a photo with his daughters and his great grandson (C, bottom); Yu Changxiang sitting in front of his home (R, top); Yu Changxiang listening to the radio (C, central); Yu Changxiang standing in front of his home. Yu Changxiang was born on Oct. 19, 1927. After Japanese invaders occupied Nanjing, Yu Changxiang and some of his families succeeded to escape from the massacre by hiding in a tunnel of Saozhou alley. However, Changxiang's natural father was murdered and his foster father was stabbed 7 times by the invaders. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng, Li Xiang)

Combo photo taken on Nov. 26, 2019 shows Xu Jiaqing, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre, taking a walk in a residential area (L, top); Xu Jiaqing viewing recreational video clips at home (L, central); Xu Jiaqing telling his experience (L, bottom); the portrait of Xu Jiaqing (C, top); Xu Jiaqing posing for a photo with his daughter Xu Xiaoxia and son-in-law Zhang Gaoming (C, bottom); Xu Jiaqing having lunch with his family (R, top); Xu Jiaqing sitting in his bedroom (R, central); Xu Jiaqing showing his certificate as survivor of the Nanjing Massacre. Xu Jiaqing was born on Feb. 8, 1925. After the Japanese invaders occupied Nanjing, Xu Jiaqing and his family hided in a shelter on Shigu Road. After they moved to another residential point, a few Japanese invaders found them. Xu Jiaqing and three adults went for the card, but two never came back. Xu Jiaqing also witnessed his family members being undressed, tied and forced to kneel by the Japanese invaders. Now Xu Jiaqing has five sons and three daughters and lives with his youngest daughter. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng)

Combo photo taken on Dec. 5, 2019 shows Wu Jiying (L), a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre, resting and chatting with her neighbor (L, top); Wu Jiying sitting in her bedroom (L, central); Wu Jiying chatting with her daughters (L, bottom); the portrait of Wu Jiying (C, top); Wu Jiying posing for a photo with her son Zhang Aihua, her daughters Zhang Yuezhen (2nd, R) and Zhang Suqin (C, bottom); Wu Jiying pointing her wound stabbed by the Japanese invaders (R, top); Wu Jiying walking at home (R, central); Wu Jiying preparing to have lunch at home. Wu Jiying was born on June 15, 1924. Due to her family debt, the 10-year-old Wu Jiying was sold to a Zhang family as maid in Nanjing. When the Japanese invaders occupied Nanjing, Wu was stabbed in her leg. She succeeded to escape by hiding among corpses and later was brought to hometown Jurong by his father. Now Wu Jiying has two sons and four daughters. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng)

Combo photo taken on Nov. 7, 2019 shows the portrait of Guan Shunhua, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre (L, top); Guan Shunhua sitting at home (1st L, bottom); Guan Shunhua chatting with her daughter Liu Yufang (2nd L, bottom); Guan Shunhua showing her certificate as survivor of the Nanjing Massacre (R, top); Guan Shunhua trimming vegetables for cooking (R, central); Guan Shunhua posing for a photo with her daughter Liu Yufang and her grandson's wife Ou Liuling. Guan Shunhua was born on Aug. 10, 1925. Before Japanese invaders occupied Nanjing, Guan and her family moved to Huai'an, and later returned to a refugee camp in Nanjing. Guan's uncle was murdered by the Japanese invaders. Guan Shunhua got married at 19 and now has a daughter. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng)

Combo photo taken on Nov. 7, 2019 shows Jing Zhizhen, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre, taking care of flowers at home (L, top); Jing Zhizhen practicing calligraphy at home (L, central); Jing Zhizhen's daughter He Minxia brushing her hair (L, bottom); the portrait of Jing Zhizhen (C, top); Jing Zhizhen posing for a photo with her daughter He Minxia and her son He Minkun (C, bottom); Jing Zhizhen sitting in her bedroom (R, top); Jing Zhizhen chatting with her family at home (R, central); Jing Zhizhen standing in front of her home. Jing Zhizhen was born on Sept. 29, 1928. When Japanese invaders occupied Nanjing, Zhizhen and her family firstly hided in the countryside and later in a refugee camp in Shanghai. Jing Zhizhen's uncle was murdered by invaders and her grandmother went stark mad. Jing Zhizhen got married in 1947, and has a daughter and three sons. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing, Ji Chunpeng)

Photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows the survivor of the Nanjing Massacre Fang Suxia sitting at home. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing)

Photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows the portrait of Fang Suxia, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

Photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows the survivor of the Nanjing Massacre Fang Suxia reading newspapers at home. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

Photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows the survivor of the Nanjing Massacre Fang Suxia chatting with her husband Zhou Wenshu at home. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Han Yuqing)

Photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows Fang Suxia, a survivor of the Nanjing Massacre, exercising in a residential community. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

The survivor of the Nanjing Massacre Fang Suxia (R, back) posing for a photo with her sisters Fang Suzhen (front) and Fang Suying in 1994 (copy photo). This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua)

Photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows the survivor of the Nanjing Massacre Fang Suxia posing for a photo with her husband and daughter. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

Photo taken on Nov. 13, 2019 shows the survivor of the Nanjing Massacre Fang Suxia taking a walk with her daughter in a community. This year marks the 82nd anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, in which more than 300,000 Chinese were killed by the Japanese invaders who occupied Nanjing on Dec. 13, 1937, marking the start of six weeks of destruction, pillage, rape and slaughter in the city. By Dec. 12, 2019, the number of registered survivors of the massacre has decreased to 78. Reporters from Xinhua spent many years to look for the survivors of Nanjing Massacre and record their current lives. (Xinhua/Ji Chunpeng)

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Editor:Catherine